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Sue McQueenie

Why should I target my PR?

PR, MarketingSue McQueenieComment

Do you target your PR? If not, you could be missing the mark. Read more about why targeting your PR is important.

Blogger….or blagger?

PR, DigitalSue McQueenieComment

Thinking about using influencers in your marketing strategy? Read our top tips on how to make sure you get the most out of this type of marketing and reach the right people. 

Don’t fall at the first hurdle, keep PR newsworthy

PRSue McQueenie

Getting your PR placed in news publications is no easy feat, but don't fall at the first hurdle, always make sure your PR is newsworthy. Read more to find out how. 

PR that's not just PR but Content

PRSue McQueenie

TALK to any marketer who knows their stuff and you’ll be sure to hear the words digital, channels, analytics and content as they discuss strategies for your business or charity. 

And it got me to thinking, in this modern, digital world of instant news and instant information, is there really still a place for good old fashioned PR? 

I have to confess to a bias here, my background is journalism and PR; Robin, the other half of McQueenie Mulholland comes from the marketing and charity world. When we set up our company we felt our skills complimented each other, but I think we have both been surprised at the resilience of PR over the last year. 

With all the client work we do we look at the message we are relaying, who it is being relayed to and how that audience consumes the message. And traditional media, whether newspapers or magazines, TV and radio, still play an important role. The majority of our clients still view the traditional media as vitally important in reaching their target audience. 

So we were pleased that one of our core products, PR, continues to be relevant. But, the thing is, we’re not calling it PR anymore. We’re calling it content (there’s that word again!). 

And this blog is about sharing what we’ve found has worked especially well for our clients, which has been using a traditional piece of PR as a core product which is then developed to be used across many different channels. 

We still approach a subject in the same way. We talk to our clients about what they want to achieve with their marketing and PR. We research and write the subject the same way PR experts have done over the years and then we use our contacts to place the piece - whether it be in the local paper or a national glossy. 

But then we what we do is we give them even better value for money. We take that story (or content!) and we develop it for the client to use on their website, we change it again for them to use on social media, we change it again for them to use in their e-newsletter...the list goes on. One piece of writing (or content) developed for each channel according to the audience we are targeting - it’s brilliant! 

And do you know the beauty of it? We can measure it. So in the dark old days before the internet you might have received a few more calls, or had a few more people visit your shop, now we can see how many people click through to your website from a newsletter or interact with you on social media. And because we can measure it we can make it work even harder for you. 

So, yes, there is a future for PR - in fact it looks pretty rosy. We just have to call it content...

8 tips to consider when carrying out a rebrand

StrategySue McQueenie

We’re currently working with one of our charity clients on a rebrand. In this blog we explore some of the challenges organisations can face when rebranding and have come up with eight top tips to help smooth this transition.

So to give one example from our work, a client we are working with has spent a lot of money on research and developed an exciting new brand which is ready to be introduced. The concept behind the new brand is that it will make the public understand them better and improve their profile in the community. The question is, how do we help them roll it out in a timely and effective way.

And it’s not just a matter of introducing a new look. How do you liaise with the media to tell them about your change? What does it mean to your clients or customers?

If re-branding is something you are considering for your organisation a strategy is essential - here are our eight top tips:

  1. Set up a steering group and identify a project manager to oversee the rebrand, as well as a couple of brand champions from different departments within your organisation.
  2. Involve an outside agency or expert to work alongside you through the process. Even branding experts bring in people from outside to advise them on a rebrand.
  3. You will need to carry out inventories of all the places your brand appears. These will be the ‘physical’ items like letterheads, leaflets and signage, and digital platforms like your website, social media and email signatures. Involve your steering group in working through these.
  4. Talk to your stakeholders, if you are a charity it will be your trustees, about why you are rebranding. Ensure that everyone who needs to be is ‘on message’ about the brand’s new values.
  5. Remember this process will not happen overnight. The bigger the organisation and the more established the brand, the longer it will take.
  6. Give yourself plenty of time to roll out the changes. Some organisations find a phased roll out with targets to be met by key dates is the most effective way to complete a rebrand.
  7. Plan a detailed media campaign to support you as you roll out your new brand. Use this rebrand as a chance to gain coverage in the media and raise the profile of your organisation.
  8. And, importantly, tell your staff. Tell them why it is happening and when it is happening. The re-brand of the client I mentioned above involves a name change, it can take a long time to break habits, so make sure people have plenty of warning.