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Client donations: Test channels not just the ask itself

StrategyRob Mulholland

In our work with charities (especially smaller ones) we see a lot of concern and reluctance to ask clients, who benefit from an organisation's services, for donations. It's understandable and we recommend that all charities consider key client demographic attributes before developing client-focused fundraising strategies. 

Recently, after analysing its client database and concluding its clients were suitable for a fundraising 'ask', a charity we've been working with decided to embark on such a test. 

However, rather than just focus on the obvious, we proposed the charity test not just asking for a donation but also testing the channels in which it used to do so. In doing so, we opted to test post versus email versus telephone all of which would utilise the same creative proposition (a client feedback survey) and fundraising ask - the results were compelling. 

Below is an infographic that gives the basic headline results of our test, from which we learnt:

 


1) This charity's clients are willing and able to give donations - 18.8% said they would do so.

2) While telephone performed the best in terms of clients completing the survey (26.7% did so), telephone also performed the worst in terms of actual donations received (0% - possibly due to the recent scandal and mistrust of telephone fundraising)

3) Email and post had equally the same number of donations but email out performed post in terms of the average donation value (£20 compared with £10 respectively)

4) Due to its non-tangible quality, email by far out performed post in terms of Return On Investment - with a positive ROI of 6.7 to 1.

 

As a result of this work McQueenie Mulholland is now developing a second test for the charity and re-examining its digital strategy for both fundraising and communications objectives.